Stories Behind The Story: More NASCAR Moments that Could Never Happen Again

Article Contents

Army Air Force Exchange Veterans Block

In This Article

Joshua Lipowski

Joshua Lipowski

All Posts

Let us know what you think

Join the conversation on socials

Army Air Force Exchange Veterans Desktop
NASCAR 75th Anniversary Commemorative Magazine

In NASCAR, and in life in general, there are always multiple sides to a story. Each side gives insight into pieces that would not be seen on a normal TV broadcast or things related to that. Here we have insight from five great NASCAR moments that could not happen again via the Scene Vault Podcast.

Petty Brothers on the Richard Petty 1983 Charlotte Motor Speedway Engine Fiasco

Richard Petty’s 1983 win at Charlotte has always been mired in controversy. The 198th career win in his career was tainted by an engine that was over 20 cubic inches too big and left side tires on the right side.

As a result, Petty was penalized 104 points and fined $35,000. A fine so hefty that it forced Petty to leave the team his father founded for two seasons. He would eventually sign with Mike Curb for two seasons.

However, the one who likely suffered the largest penalty was Maurice Petty, the engine builder. As Richie Petty, Mark Petty, and and Timmie Petty put it, it cost Maurice his career. In spite of that, he handled it well.

“It showed me how much of a man my dad is.” Mark said, “He took that on his shoulders. He took it wholeheartedly.”

In spite of this moment being incredibly difficult for Maurice and the Petty clan, it did have a positive in the end. Timmy went so far as to claim it saved Maurice’s life.

“Looking back at how intense daddy was, him getting out for a while probably saved the man’s life,” Timmy said, “Because of (Maurice) having high blood pressure, stress and all that.”

At the end of the day, the brothers end on the same mantra. “It is what it is.” For the full story, watch the video clip below.

Tim Brewer on Turmoil at Junior Johnson & Associated Around 1992 Hooters 500.

Junior Johnson and Tim Brewer did not end their time together on the best of terms. The 1992 Hooters 500 was the final straw as Brewer was fired in victory lane after they had lost the Cup Series Championship.

One thing Brewer brought up was an argument him and Johnson had during the week prior at Phoenix. A day that saw the 11 car have multiple engine issues. Brewer elected to not tell Johnson about potential changing the engine prior to the race, leaving Johnson out of the loop.

Even after Atlanta, there was more discussion from Brewer about turmoil between him and Johnson. Including an argument about who was going back on a team plane, and even bringing up conversations about Johnson not liking the drinking that his team was getting up to. For the full story, watch the video clip below.

Buddy Parrot on the 1984 Firecracker 400 Motor

The engine Richard Petty used for the 1984 Firecracker 400 was nearly repossesed. Robert Yates walked up to Buddy Parrot during race weekend and said that someone else had asked for the engine back. Parrot responded.

“There’s not enough people that you can gather up that can come over and get that motor out of that car,” Parrot said, “You can go tell them Gardners that if they want that motor they can get it after the race.”

Parrot later said that the motor they used was so big, that he would be “embarrassed if they did not win the race. Win Petty did, and he now has 200 career wins. For the full story, watch the video clip below.

John Dodson Talks About the Fight after the 1989 All-Star Race

The 1989 Winston is one of the most iconic All-Star Races of all time. Rusty Wallace turned Darrell Waltrip off of the final corner, sending Waltrip into a spin and Wallace to victory lane.

John Dodson was a tire changer on Wallace’s team. He says he took home $2,000 thanks to this race, and he also claims that Sandy Jones of Darrell Waltrip was the one who started the fight after kicking the car. Todd Parrott responded by elbowing Jones, and the fight was on.

“I see this and I say ‘That’s my team’.” Dodson said, “You’ve got my guy up against that trailer.”

Dodson then went to confront Jones, who bit Dodson’s thumb. The tustle continued with Jones putting Dodson in a headlock. After some tustle Dodson eventually got pulled away by a 6’6″ security guard. For the full story, watch the video below.

Todd Bodine Gives his Perspective on his brother Geoff’s crash at Daytona in 2000.

Where was Todd Bodine during his brother Geoff’s crash at Daytona in 2000? He was on his motorhome alongside his other brother Brett and could not see the crash unfolding because he could not see the frontstretch.

After a worrying silence, Todd peeked down at a TV in the motorhome next to him, and decided to walk to sew what happened not knowing the wreck involved Geoff. Eventually he found out it was his brother, and there was concern.

“From that moment on, I know for myself, and I’m pretty sure I speak for Brett that we pretty much don’t remember anything,” Todd said.

From there, Todd and Brett got in a car to drive to Halifax Medical Center. After getting out of the car, the Motor Racing Outreach preacher gave them amazing news.

“He’s alive and he’s not hurt.” the preacher said.

When Todd finally made it into the room to see Geoff, everything Todd saw on Geoff’s body was black and blue. Despite that, Geoff was going to be okay. Todd says to this day that he cannot watch the footage of the crash.

As for how Geoff survived? Todd says that Geoff claims his father spoke to him during the crash.

“I really think that’s why he survived.” Todd said, “Dad was riding with him…It really makes you believe in divine intervention.”

There truly is nothing like the story behind the story. The stories behind those moments in NASCAR history we all remember.

Fram Desktop

Share this:

Joshua Lipowski

Joshua Lipowski

All Posts

Get Silly Season Alerts

Stay up to speed on all the latest silly season news delivered right to your inbox.