Search
Close this search box.
Search
Close this search box.

Which NASCAR Tracks Are Due for a Repave Soon?

Article Contents

Article Contents

Let us know what you think

Join the conversation on socials

Picture of Joshua Lipowski

Joshua Lipowski

All Posts

In NASCAR, there are fewer words that scare either a race fan, a driver, or a race track more than the word “Repave”. They are expensive, the racing product often takes a hit at least for a few years, and they are not as fun to drive. However, they are necessary, so, which tracks are due for a repave in the coming years?

One caveat: we will not be including North Wilkesboro on this list since it will be repaved before the 2024 season.

Richmond Raceway

Last Repave: 2004

Of all the tracks on this list, this is probably the track that most NASCAR fans would not mind seeing a repave of in the near future. The recent races there have not been received particularly well by fans. Some would argue it has gotten to that point that Atlanta was at in 2021.

The surface is so old and so slick with tire wear so extreme that it often hurts the racing product more than it helps. Some may blame the short track package of the Next-Gen car, but even the later Gen-6 races at the track were not received well. Some may groan over this, particularly the drivers, but, a repave or even a reconfiguration may be what the track needs.

Sonoma Raceway

Last Repave: 2003 (Partial); 1985 (Full)

It’s been almost 40 years since Sonoma Raceway has been fully resurfaced, so, it is due for a repave. Some of the track was repaved in 2003, but, 20 years is still a long time for a race track. Now, road courses are not impacted the same with repaves that ovals are, but, maybe Sonoma could use the facelift.

The racing product there has been hit-or-miss, and it is notorious for having very little grip. Maybe a new track surface could allow drivers to more aggressively attack the track. Then again, a repave might mean less tire wear, which could hamper the racing product to an extent.

Dover Motor Speedway

Last Repave: 1995

Dover is one of three concrete race tracks on the schedule, and the surface is as durable as they claimed. The track was repaved with concrete in the mid-1990s, and it has remained the same ever since. Save for one incident with Jamie McMurray in 2014, the surface has held up pretty well.

The question is how long can it hold up given it has not been resurfaced in nearly three decades. At some point, they will have to, but the question is when? Dover is in no hurry, and understandably so with how durable concrete is. It would not be shocking to see the surface be repaved sometime soon.

Indianapolis Motor Speedway

Last Repave: 2004

We actually have a direct quote from the president of the speedway, Doug Boles, that actually gives some insight into when IMS may be repaved. In 2018, they did some what the track called, “Routine Maintenance” to the track surface, which had last been repaved in 2004. Boles said they should get, “At least another 3-5 years out of this surface.”

Well, 2023 is five years from 2018. Now, the track is now under new ownership with Roger Penske buying the facility and the entirety of the IndyCar Series in 2019, so, maybe the timeline has changed. However, this comment means that it may not be too long before IMS gets their track resurfaced, and, the return of the Brickyard 400 may be an interesting test for the surface.

Homestead-Miami Speedway

Last Repave: 2003

Fand may not be happy to see Homestead-Miami on the list as it is one of the most popular 1.5-mile venues in the sport. However, it has been 20 years since it was repaved. At what point does the track reach that Atlanta-type stage where it’s too slippery and too tough on tires to race on?

It may not happen this year, but it could happen in the near future. The good news is the track has variable banking in it already, so, if it is resurfaced, there will be some character to it and multiple grooves from day one. It may not happen immediately, but it will happen eventually.

Track repaves are not things that fans, tracks, or drivers look forward to. However, these tracks may have to bite the bullet in the near future.

Let us know what you think

Join the conversation on socials

Share this:

Picture of Joshua Lipowski

Joshua Lipowski

All Posts